Tagged with travel

The Letter

It’s been a while since I dabbled in fiction. Here’s a short piece to show my short story chops: She sat at her desk. She had to start some time. Sometime was now. But how? Pen and paper, or laptop? Laptop would be better. She could type as fast as her racing thoughts were pouring … Continue reading

Not Bad for a First Draft

Not Bad for a First Draft

I first discovered the author R C Sherrif in a biography of the silent filmmaker James Whale, who gave the world the first Frankenstein films, and who was the centre of the wonderful film, ‘Gods and Monsters’.  Sherrif was his ‘special friend’ in an age when the term gay was used widely and innocently. Sheriff … Continue reading

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Sunderland Bay

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Sunderland Bay

This is one of the most touching examples of what was happening in the 18th centuryand the legacy of slavery. Sunderland Point, Morecombe Bay, Lancashire  Sunderland was once a busy transhipment port, so many people and goods from many places passed through the area.   Sambo or Samboo apparently arrived in Britain 1736 as either … Continue reading

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Wales

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Wales

Piercefield Estate, nr Chepstow The estate was purchased for £90,000 cash in 1802 by Nathanial Wells, born in St Kitts 1779 the son of William, a Cardiff sugar merchant and his house slave Juggy.  He married the only daughter of Charles Este, a former chaplain to George II. Camarthen, St Peter’s Church Burial place of Sir Richard … Continue reading

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Somerset

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Somerset

Wrington Home of  Hannah More (1745-1833) poet playwright and social campaigner, called ‘the Prelate in petticoats’. Wrington was also the birthplace of John Locke (1632-1704) philospher was born in a small cottage adjoining the north side of the church, his mother’s family home. Frome ‘An Essay on the Abolition of Slavery Throughout the British Dominions Without Injury to the Master … Continue reading

Not Impressing the English

Not Impressing the English

This is a description of a visit to France and the Netherlands, of the new Palais Royal in Paris in 1817 by J. Merritt of Liverpool: “In the evening we visited the far-famed square of the Palais Royal, to which our hotel is fortunately immediately adjacent. Here again, I must confess, that the first aspect … Continue reading

A Bounty of Norfolk Island

A Bounty of Norfolk Island

More from the far frontiers of scientific research: Residents of  Australia’s Norfolk Island, home to the descendants of the mutineers of Captain Bligh’s HMS Bounty, have been found to have much lower rates of short sightedness in the world. This incidence is about half the level in Australia, suggesting there may be some genetic link. … Continue reading

You’ve Still Got Texas

You’ve Still Got Texas

Sometimes I amaze myself at the strange words and concepts that escape from me without warning. This morning I was chatting to a woman from the States who, like everyone, is bemoaning the state of their own nation’s economy. I know Wall Street is in meltdown, I know that there’s no money for their world … Continue reading

By Bridge or by Ferry

By Bridge or by Ferry

This is from a tour of France by Frances Jane Carey in 1816 -7: “We crossed the rivers by several stone bridges: the last, at the entrance to the town, is handsome and modern; the others are of a more ancient date. But there was no bridge at all at the town of Saumur until … Continue reading