Tagged with religion

Misreading the Middle East

Journalists and politicians often talk nonsense on the Middle East. I shouted at a newspaper article by Howard Jacobson who claimed the Jews have been persecuted by Christians for 2,000 years, and recently an MP stated that shiites and sunni Moslems had been fighting each other for over 3,000 years. After the wonderful book by … Continue reading

A Single Glass of Ale?

This is from London’s ‘Morning Herald’ Thursday, Juyly 1st, 1830 “A Police Notice Guildhall Yesterday a decently-dressed man, who gave his name George Gunn, was charged with disturbing the congregation at St Bride’s church on Sunday morning last, by snoring so loudly as to prevent all those who happened to be near him from hearing … Continue reading

Kids Trying the Patience of Saints

This is for anyone who thinks kids of today are out of control. They are nothing to the kids of the 19th century. Not sure why there were so many homeless kids in the mid century – possibly many were orphans in the wake of the cholera outbreaks which had raged from 1832, combined with … Continue reading

A Hidden Beadsman

A Hidden Beadsman

Another fine tomb in St Mary’s Priory church, Abergavenny is that of Sir Richard Herbert of Ewyas, the illegitimate son of Sir Richard Herbert, so grandson to William ap Thomas and Lady Gwladys. But he still managed to be buried in this fine tomb, with the carving of a ┬áBeadsman, or Benedictine Monk beneath his … Continue reading

A Dog at Her Feet

A Dog at Her Feet

I have seen a lot of medieval tombs in churches, with the departed lying in their fine clothes, their heads on ornate cushions and their feet resting on their favourite dogs. But usually they are against the church wall, with the husband in front so it is hard to make out the woman’s details. This … Continue reading

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Cambridge University

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Cambridge University

┬áPeter Peckard studied at Oxford, then served in the army before becoming master of Magdalene College, then vice chancellor at Cambridge. The Zong incident, when 133 slaves were thrown overboard by the ship’s captain to claim insurance shocked the nation and like many others, it seems to have stirred this liberal into becoming an active … Continue reading

Travelling with St Thomas’s Leg

Travelling with St Thomas’s Leg

Today’s i newspaper had a great story, about a school in Lancashire’s collection which they are trying to make accessible to the public via the Christian Heritage Centre. Ho hum, you may be thinking, but this is Britain’s largest collection of religious relics. In Europe there is still enough Catholicism scattered through communities that the … Continue reading

What No Man Knew

What No Man Knew

I have just got a copy of ‘The Wonderfvll Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster’, a copy of Thomas Potts’ original book of the Pendle Witch Trials of 1612. This is one book I couldn’t not buy – who doesn’t like a good witch story? And this is one of the most famous, … Continue reading

Where Did they Go?

Where Did they Go?

In an earlier post, I mentioned the effect of the Act of Uniformity that forced Ministers to adhere to the practices of the Chruch of England, but some 5,000 chose to leave their posts, often to a life of immense hardship. But some relocated. The following is from the biography of Richard Price, (1723-91) a … Continue reading