Tagged with National Trust

Sutton House

Sutton House

This is a National Trust property and the oldest home in East London. It was built by the courtier Sir Ralph Sadleir in 1535. His wife was a cousin of Oliver Cromwell. Instead of tapestries or wallpaper, the walls were covered with panels carved into ‘linenfold’ shapes, all of which were different. Some were painted. … Continue reading

Tudor Merchant’s House, Tenby

Tudor Merchant’s House, Tenby

This is a wonderful National Trust property in the centre of the old town, just up the hill from the main beach. As always, the staff are incredibly friendly and informative. The kitchen fireplace The “necessary House” in the kitchen, with a drop onto a gravel and reed bed to filter and flush away all … Continue reading

After the Fire

Last year one of the nation’s most important 18th century mansions went up in flames. When I saw it on the news I thought that was the end of it, but miraculously, parts of it survived and the National Trust is now restoring it. Not to its full original state, as too much was lost … Continue reading

London Open Spaces

The current battle against development on open land is one that has been ongoing in Britain since the first enclosures of common land in the 16th century, though it is the massive increase in these land grabs that are more famous. The need for open spaces took on and urgency when it was realised how … Continue reading

Snowdrops

This is the entrance to the Manchester art gallery advertising a big exhibition commemorating by he centenary of the start of WW1. The flowers are not usually associated with remembrance, but they are symbols of spring, of rebirth, renewal.

National Trust Goes Green

For those outside Britain, The National Trust is one of the great charitable organisations, that maintains many historic properties, and so is landlord to a lot of countryside. They also encourage the use of green technology and encourage people to visit their properties without their cars. But now they have gone a step further, as … Continue reading