Tagged with NASA

Capturing Asteroids

This seems to be an idea from science fiction, and for no apparent useful purpose, but this article from the i on 2 June suggests otherwise: Asteroids were once viewed as the vermin of the sky, disrupting astronomical observations by leaving streaks on long-exposure photographic plates used to stay the stars. How times have changed. … Continue reading

Spaced Jellyfish

Twenty years ago, NASA sent 60,000 tiny jellyfish into space to see how they adapted to changes in gravity whilst in near-earth orbit. The reasoning was to investigate how humans born in  space might adapt to being back on earth. The returned jellyfish were found to have trouble swimming on earth. As reported in the … Continue reading

Voyager has Left the Solar System

Voyager has Left the Solar System

Way back on 20 August 1977 Voyager One was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, two weeks after its sister Voyager Two. It  is now, unlike many of us alive then,  still going strong. What is really astounding is that its processing power is a fraction of that in a smart phone. It is travelling at … Continue reading

Ray Bradbury Read a Poem to Space Travel

Ray Bradbury Read a Poem to Space Travel

Bradbury is the last of the great generation of sci fi writers in English – I think Stanislaw Lem is still with us. He wasn’t just a brilliantly insightful writer, he was, as the clip and this poem shows, incredibly funny. This is a transcription from a resent Open Culture post, from a symposium held … Continue reading

Watching a Moving Dot

Watching a Moving Dot

HOw can watching a small black dot move across the screen be so thoroughly engaging? Maybe it’s knowing how rarely this happens. Maybe it’s the thought that lots of people  were out at some ungodly hour trying to watch it in real time. Or maybe it’s knowing that this is an event that will not … Continue reading