Tagged with history

The Books are Written!

The Books are Written!

Hello lovely readers! I apologise yet again for my long silence, but it has been productive.  I have now cleared away most of my research books and notes so I am no longer at risk of breaking my neck every time I move around my workroom. I have completed my three books which will be … Continue reading

The Appeal of History

This is the opening to Rowland Parker’s wonderful book, Men of Dunwich, about a thriving mediaeval port that was lost to the sea. He wrote another, The Common Stream, which I have but cannot find. Must be buried at the back of one of my book cases. I was woken the other night by a … Continue reading

Kafka’s Kafkaesque Ending

One of the most infuriating things I sometimes find as a historian is when people order all their papers to be destroyed on their death. I have no idea why anyone would want to do this unless it was all idle scribblings, but if they are part of history that I am researching I just … Continue reading

Slavery & Abolition Sites: Oxfordshire

Slavery & Abolition Sites: Oxfordshire

Oxford All Soul’s Library The library was founded in 1716 by Christopher Codrington (1668-1710), whose grandfather had been a pioneer settler of Barbados.  In 1690 he was elected fellow of the college and awarded a BA in 1691; he was a friend of many Oxford wits and wrote poetry.  In 1700 he came into an … Continue reading

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Somerset

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Somerset

Wrington Home of  Hannah More (1745-1833) poet playwright and social campaigner, called ‘the Prelate in petticoats’. Wrington was also the birthplace of John Locke (1632-1704) philospher was born in a small cottage adjoining the north side of the church, his mother’s family home. Frome ‘An Essay on the Abolition of Slavery Throughout the British Dominions Without Injury to the Master … Continue reading

The Great Vowel Shift

text-headerFor anyone who has had to explain our wonderful but exasperating mother tongue, this may be of help. Ever wondered why read can be pronounced two different ways, and why more than one  goose is a geese but a group of moose are not meese, then all is explained by this verbal earthquake which struck … Continue reading