Tagged with Highways and Byways of Oxford and the Cotswolds

The Wool Staple

This comes from The Highways and Byways of Oxford and the Cotswolds: “In 1363 the Staple, as the licensed mart for the sale of English products was called, was, after several changes, definitely fixed at Calais, and here buyers from all parts of the continent would congregate. We can in imagination draw a picture of … Continue reading

Cross Hands

There are a lot of old pubs with this name, usually at a cross roads, so I guessed this was the reason. This is from Highways and Byways of Oxford and the Cotswolds: “@WE may now descend to Campden either across the fields by the Fish Inn – a small isolated public built in 1771, … Continue reading

Literacy and the Poor

This is from Highways and Byways of Oxford and the Cotswolds, relating to the village of Hanwell: “[the Puritan divine] John Dod, Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge… held the living in Hanwell from 1580 to 1604, and according to the unimpeachable testimony of Fuller, was ‘by nature a witty, by industry a learned, by grace … Continue reading

Early Fox Hunting

The government recently tried to legalise fox hunting again, but failed in part due to the badly written bill. Here si an account when such debates just didn’t happen, from Highways and Byways of Oxford and the Cotswolds: “The traveller may have a rapid glance at all the various features of the landscape: vast rolling … Continue reading

The First Oxford Colleges

This is some more from Highways and Byways of Oxford and the Cotswolds by H A Evans: “Before the coming of Walter de Merton the Oxford students had lived in private houses – whether called halls, inns or hotels… the discipline and supervision to which they were liable were merely such as could be supplied … Continue reading