Tagged with Civil War

Exporting Problems

Observers of England noted in the early 17th century England noted a huge amount of hostility between rich and poor in England. A scot noted in 1614 commented “on the bitter and distrustful’ attitude of English common people towards the gentry and nobility. The poor were not allowed to bear arms due to the risk … Continue reading

Hungry Forties

In a recent radio interview, the eminent and very rock’n’roll physicist, Professor Brian Cox claimed ‘All dates are arbitrary, which is particularly important if you are mad.’ He was talking about the recent end of the world dates thingy, and of course being an eminent scientist he is absolutely right. But there is something very … Continue reading

Was the Prize Worth the Pain?

Most accounts of England’s Civil War – or any civil war, for that matter, come from the combatants. The real victims – the ordinary people who have strangers marauding through their villages, committing atrocities – are largely invisible. But this is again from Adam Nicholson’s ‘Arcadia: “The men and women of the county found themselves … Continue reading

Hiram Cronk’s Funeral

Hiram Cronk’s Funeral

I have just watched the film of the funeral of Hiram Cronk, May 17 1905 in New York. He was 105 years old, the last survivor of the War of 1812. This war has been largely forgotten, and every time I see mention of it in whatever research I am doing, I keep meaning to … Continue reading

Driving with Death

Driving with Death

“You’re not leaving this room again tonight,” said my friend Janette, her voice shaking with fear as she leant against the locked door of our hotel room. “But I need the bathroom. If I don’t go now I’ll wet myself,” I pleaded. “I promise I won’t be long, and you can lock the door after … Continue reading

Bartered Brides

Bartered Brides

As a sort of coda to my previous, this is about a practice that seemed to appear in the wake of the English Civil War, when churches were vandalised and some used as stables and markets,  and continued well into the 18th century. The idea of a wife standing in the public market place so … Continue reading