Tagged with Cambridge University

The Serenity of the Sage, Innocence of a Child

Bath in the 18th century had a lot of famous visitors, but one of the most important residents was William Herschel, who, with his sister Caroline, made huge contributions to early astronomy. But just as important, though in different ways, was William’s only child, John, described by the famous astronomer Patrick Moore as having made … Continue reading

Protecting Apostrophes

Apostrophes can cause all sorts of problems. On one hand, they are essential for clear communication, and when they are wrongly used, they can be funny to those who know enough about them. But they also take up extra ink on roadsigns, and so they are being phased out in some areas. Because really, the … Continue reading

Traditions and Funding

One of the most famous sporting events on the British calendar is the annual rowing race on the Thames between the teams of Oxford and Cambridge. The teams are always male, of course, even though there is a women’s race, which nobody ever hears of, hidden away at Henley and without a full time coach … Continue reading

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Cambridge University

Slavery & Abolition Sites – Cambridge University

 Peter Peckard studied at Oxford, then served in the army before becoming master of Magdalene College, then vice chancellor at Cambridge. The Zong incident, when 133 slaves were thrown overboard by the ship’s captain to claim insurance shocked the nation and like many others, it seems to have stirred this liberal into becoming an active … Continue reading

Meanwhile, Over at Cambridge

Meanwhile, Over at Cambridge

Just to keep this blog balanced, Cambridge scientists have found that our Neanderthal ancestors differed from modern humans and the group that replaced them, Homo Sapiens, in having overdeveloped right arms. This difference meant that their right arms were up to 50% stronger than their left arms. This means that they were carrying out either … Continue reading

Beliefs and Mirrors

Beliefs and Mirrors

I’m currently trawling though a book on literature and the English Civil War, and found a real gem by Benjamin Laney (1591-1675) who was vice chancellor of Cambridge University for a while, then went into exile with King Charles II and returned to be Bishop of Peterborough, Lincoln and Ely. I can’t find enough on … Continue reading