Filed under sculpture

A True Romance

A True Romance

Here’s some rather wonderful images from Winchester Cathedral. Many old churches have lovely carved tombs to dead crusaders, but this one, remembering the Earl of Arundel and his second wife Eleanor, from about 1307 is rather special. Despite their wealth they left instructions to be buried together without pomp. She has her legs crossed, like … Continue reading

John Gibson – A British Sculptor in Rome

John Gibson – A British Sculptor in Rome

I knew many British people did the Grand Tour to widen their education, but had no idea some artists lived and worked there. Gibson (1790-1866) was born in Conwy, Wales but settled in Rome in 1817 where he studied with Antonio Canova and set up his own studio which itself became a tourist attraction for … Continue reading

Artist at Work

As part of the recent Made in Roath arts festival in Cardiff, the former YHA was open to the public to see the artists’ studios before the inevitable developers took over the site. I was intrigued by the room occupied by David Shepherd. His room seemed to be a strange sculpture space, but it was … Continue reading

Wavy Walls

Wavy Walls

Walls are generally straight, they follow boundaries, and are made with a minimum of materials to save money and time. But sometimes they are bendy. I recall a few in isolated places that had trees planted in the bends. The walls were in an area where fields had lots of stones, so were a nuisance … Continue reading

Between Gargoyles and Grotesques

Between Gargoyles and Grotesques

A lot of people get these two terms mixed up. Gargoyles are the strange creatures that loom out of the sides of old churches to channel water away from the building; their mouths/throats are lead lined to protect them from erosion. Grotesques are strange faces. The term originates from the faces and masks found when … Continue reading

Frog With Flowers

This is in Bite Park, Cardiff but I have no idea what it means. Flowers often mean a fatality site but this seems unlikely as there is no information A strange take on Xmas? Do frogs celebrate it? Hmm

What is a clock?

This seems a stupid question. Even with our choices of dials, digital or talking, we know what they are. But mechanical time keeping began as alarm clocks, to wake priests for their services, or to announce services through the day, or for people to take lunch breaks. Sometimes the alarm would disturb a human who … Continue reading

Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge

This wonderful museum was founded by Harold Ede, former curator of London’s Tate Gallery in the 1920s and 30s. He befriended many young artists at the time, including Ben and Winifred Nicholsobn, Henry Moore etc, and through them he began collecting works by their contemporaries such as Henri Gaudier-Brzseska, Joan Miro and others. Ede married … Continue reading