Filed under research

Unearthing Medieval Trellech

Unearthing Medieval Trellech

This is from Wednesday’s i paper and is a fantastic example of the value of so-called amateurs, and how much can be achieved by local communities. It was a medieval mystery that baffled experts for decades. Now a history fan has finally unearthed the priceless remains of a lost city- thanks to a colony of … Continue reading

A Lecture on Heads

A Lecture on Heads

There were a lot of theatrical companies in London and the provinces, but when I heard of The Lecture on Heads I was intrigued and confused. What heads? And why? Gerald Kahan in his book George Alexander Stevens & The Lecture on Heads has done a great job researching the show in its many forms … Continue reading

Leprosy in Red Squirrels

Here’s an odd story from last week’s i paper: “Red squirrels in the UK and Ireland carry strains of leprosy similar to those that have afflicted disability and disfigurement on humans for centuries, a study has shown. Experts stress the chances of catching the disease from a squirrel are extremely low. Scientists tested DNA samples … Continue reading

Master Percy Praises The Lever Museum

Master Percy Praises The Lever Museum

Eighteenth century England produced a lot of child proteges who were often put on display by their partents and guardians in a way that to modern eyes seems like exploitation, but for families of humble birth could provide a welcome income. Some went on to achieve well deserved success such as the future President of … Continue reading

Albatrosses Running in Circles

Albatrosses Running in Circles

Since albatrosses are in the same family as seagulls who stamp on the ground to imitate rain, which draws their favourite food, worms, to the surface, this article fits with their family behaviour. This is by Tom Bawden in the i paper: Albatrosses secure much of their food using an extraordinary technique which involves furiously … Continue reading

Counting the Black Death

We know the epidemic known as the Black Death killed a lot of people in Britain and Europe. It put an end to the gloriously labour intensive architectural style of Decorated Gothic, to be replaced by the more austere Perpendicular. The manpower shortage was so desperate it led to the Peasants’ Revolt demanding better wages … Continue reading

Elephants Afraid of Drones

This is from yesterday’s i  paper, and is confusing reading as a recent report claimed that drones were being used to protect and monitor endangered elephants: Elephants have a deep-rooted dislike of drones, researchers have confirmed. Staff from Duke University in the USA were hoping to use the unmanned aircraft to monitor the elephant population in … Continue reading

Seafaring Red Deer

This is again from the latest Current Archaeology: Red deer reached Britain about 10,000 years ago as ice sheets withdraws, but they did not reach the Orkneys or Outer Hebrides for another 5,000 years. But recent genetic research shows the two groups were not genetically the same. More intriguingly, the deer DNA from Orkney and … Continue reading

Harry Kroto Nobel Prize Chemist

This is from Friday’s i paper. It is hard to imagine modern chemistry without the input of this man and his co-workers. As with so many top scientists, he was also a musician: Sir Harry Kroto, an English chemist who shared the 1996 Nobel Prize or his role in the discovery of the buckyball, a … Continue reading