Filed under Reformation

Relics,Witches & Ships in Bottles

Relics,Witches & Ships in Bottles

What happened to objects when Henry VIII closed the monasteries? This is an area of history that is often ignored or the subject of guesswork, especially in England where there was so much destruction of religious artefacts at the long drawn-out Reformation. But here’s some thoughts. Every church that conducted masses had to have a … Continue reading

Monstrance & Clocks

Monstrance & Clocks

Here’s a bit of seriously obscure research that took me a while to nail down. I found a few monstrance clocks but wanted to know what they were and meant. Here’s one from the collection of the Guild of Clockmakers, now in the Science Museum: The original. monstrance was an ornate container for display and … Continue reading

Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral

After my post on the glass exhibition, here’s some more images of the cathedral which is absolutely huge. I can well imagine how this place inspired thoughts of higher things as well as reminders of those who have gone to a hopefully better place. Cadaver tombs were sometimes combined with images of a bishop in … Continue reading

Polygamy In Britain

Here’s an article from yesterday’s i paper that I never thought I would read: a British man has set up a website to promote polygamy in these islands, even though this is illegal. Azad Chaiwala, the founder of SecondWife.com and polygamy.com is on a quest to normalise having more than just one wife. The 33-year-old … Continue reading

Riding of the Marches, Selkirk

This is a Scottish practice that is similar to the English Rogation ceremonies which annually confirm the parish boundaries. The custom claimed to have continued for something like 4 centuries – till early 20th century, so is post Reformation. Their treatment of sucides is harsher than the English. This is the final piece from Highways … Continue reading

The Ancient Churches of Peebles

This is some more from Highways & Byways on The Borders: There are still to be seen wishing the burgh the ruins of the Cross Church and of the Church of St Andrew. The former got its name from the fact that in May 1261 “a magnificent and venerable cross was found at Peblis”, which … Continue reading

Horse Troughs and Bedspreads

When I was researching the history of water supplies I often noted how similar horse troughs are to old stone coffins and thought they might be related. This is from Highways and Byways of Oxford and the Cotswolds: “In the days when, to quote a popular historian, “the halls of country-halls were hung with altar-cloths; … Continue reading