Filed under mediaeval history

A Bishop’s Pardon

A Bishop’s Pardon

The Treasury at Chichester Cathedral is full of fascinating items, but I love this one: A pardon for an early bishop, though it makes no mention of what he had done. This is from the information provided: Papal pardon to Godfrey, 2nd bishop of Chichester (1088, consecrated in January and died in September) found in … Continue reading

Not What it Seems

Not What it Seems

Here’s a very odd image from Cambridge’s Fitzwilliam Museum: It shows the brothers of the fraternity of the Madonna f Humility gathered round conducting the offices of the dead for their patron. Here’s the full image:

Durham Cathedral

Durham Cathedral

After my disappointment at Liverpool Anglican cathedral, I thought I’d balance things out with an account of Durham Cathedral, a place I’ve never been, but the wonderful music journalist Stuart Maconie has. This is from his book ‘Pies and Prejudice’ in which he cites Pevsner with: Durham is one of the great experiences of Europe … Continue reading

Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral

After my post on the glass exhibition, here’s some more images of the cathedral which is absolutely huge. I can well imagine how this place inspired thoughts of higher things as well as reminders of those who have gone to a hopefully better place. Cadaver tombs were sometimes combined with images of a bishop in … Continue reading

The Ancient Churches of Peebles

This is some more from Highways & Byways on The Borders: There are still to be seen wishing the burgh the ruins of the Cross Church and of the Church of St Andrew. The former got its name from the fact that in May 1261 “a magnificent and venerable cross was found at Peblis”, which … Continue reading

Kidland on the Borders

Yet another excerpt from the fascinating ‘Highways & Byways in Northumbria’ Belonging to the monastery of Newminster in the Middle Ages here is a wild mountain country reaching to the Borders. It is known as Kidland, where a few shepherds tend thousands of sheep. Part of it was granted to the monastery in 1181 by … Continue reading

Pre-Groundhog Day

Groundhog Day is celebrated in the States on 2 February, when the said beast emerges from winter hibernation. If he sees his shadow, this foretells the imminent end of winter. If he sees his shadow due to the wether being bright, he runs back underground and winter will continue for 6 more weeks. But the … Continue reading

Illegal Cricket

This comes from the Nottingham Evening Post in April 1926. Cricket as a Crime By an act of Edward IV, cricket was prohibited because its popularity threatened to interfere with the practice of archery and any person indulging in it was liable to a fine of £10 – an enormous su i those days – … Continue reading

Cotswold Crosses

Another piece from Highways and Byways of Oxford and the Cotswolds by H A Evans: “In the churchyard [of Yarnton] you will find a cross of a design more than ordinarily elaborate; on the base are sculptured 4 knights kneeling on one knee, and canopied figures of ecclesiastics on the shaft; another cross, almost identical … Continue reading

A Wiley Cleric

This is from another book in the brilliant through variable series, Highways and Byways, this time for Oxford and the Cotswolds, by H A Evans. Osney Abbey was one of two religious sites – the other being Rewley – that were near the present train station at Oxford, but totally destroyed at the Reformation. Osney … Continue reading