Filed under exile

Slavery & Abolition Research

Slavery & Abolition Research

I have just located the research I carried out as an antidote to the moanathon and misinformation of the celebrations for the Abolition of the Slave trade in Britain in 2007. I thought I had lost all this information but have just located it so  will be including the work on this blog.  At the … Continue reading

William Was Not Alone

William Was Not Alone

William Herschell (1738-1822) is famous for his pioneering astronomy, specifically for his discovery of the planet Uranus and two of its moons. He was born in Hnnover, but when their ruling family became the rulers of Britain, many Germans followed in search of employment. He began as a military musician, and spent much of his … Continue reading

Travelling with St Thomas’s Leg

Travelling with St Thomas’s Leg

Today’s i newspaper had a great story, about a school in Lancashire’s collection which they are trying to make accessible to the public via the Christian Heritage Centre. Ho hum, you may be thinking, but this is Britain’s largest collection of religious relics. In Europe there is still enough Catholicism scattered through communities that the … Continue reading

The Missing Elizabeth

The Missing Elizabeth

Elizabeth of Bohemia, The Winter Queen  (1596-1662), is a character whose name appears  from time to time in my reading but I have just discovered her part of the British royal jigsaw. She was the only child to survive of James I/IV and Anne of Denmark, so her brother was Charles I. On Valentine’s Day, … Continue reading

Conjugating Absence

Conjugating Absence

I have just read a review of a new book on the victims of the Soviet Gulags, in which they conjectured as to why these horrors are so much less known than those of the Jewish Holocaust. The author suggested it was perhaps due to the size of the crimes, but I don’t buy that, … Continue reading

Writing Home

Writing Home

John Frost was a political activist, sentenced to death – the last case of high treason – with 3 of his colleagues, for  leading the 3/4 November 1839 uprising in Newport, Wales, but transported to Van Dieman’s Land (now Tasmania) instead. He was expecting a life of immense hardship, with a high probability that he … Continue reading

Songs About Ships and Sailors

Songs About Ships and Sailors

I am interested in the few remaining dangerous professions, hence my  earlier post about coalmining. So here’s another group about ships and the men who sailed them. Shipbuilding was for centuries a huge industry in this country – the harbourside of Bristol was lined with shipyards; timber for them came in from mostly the Baltic. Bark … Continue reading

Crusoe by Choice

Crusoe by Choice

Robert Southey(1774-1843)  was a Romantic poet, colleague of the more famous Wordsworth and Coleridge, and poet laureate from 1813 to his death 30 years later. His brother is less famous but his brother Thomas was a ship’s captain who wrote The Chronological History of the West Indies, published in 1827 from which the following is … Continue reading