Filed under drinking fountain

Thirsty Kid

Thirsty Kid

One of my favourite topics in history is water supply, as there was such a long battle to achieve safe supplies for us all. The London Drinking Fountain and Horse Trough Association built loads of fresh water fountains in British cities, in the 19th century, and many towns still have their granite horse troughs, often … Continue reading

Scrivens Conduit

Scrivens Conduit

This is a companion piece in Hillfield Park, is also listed as grade II* and a scheduled monument. It was originally on Southgate Street in 1636 as a public water outlet, paid for by Alderman John Scriven. The water came from Robinswood Hill springs, possibly following a Roman conduit It is an odd mix of … Continue reading

King’s Board

King’s Board

This is an extraordinary survivor, and is now in Hillfield Park, on London Road. Its origin is unclear, but seems to have been erected as a rectangular structure in the 14thcentury in Westgate street in the town centre. Tradition is that it was presented to the city by King Richard II. It may have been … Continue reading

St Georges Gardens

St Georges Gardens

This green space is tucked away behind the Foundling Hospital in London’s Bloomsbury, and was one of the first burial grounds in the city to be built at a distance from a parish church. It was opened in 1715, and served the parishes of St George the Martyr Holborn and St Georges’ Bloomsbury. It covered … Continue reading