Filed under current affairs

Breathing Can Cause Weight Gain

This is one of the most bonkers stories I’ve come across, but it is rather worrying. This is from the i paper: A new study finds that people are putting on weight simply by inhaling house dust because much of it contains chemicals that interfere with the body’s hormones. The culprits are “obesogens” known as … Continue reading

Earth’s Toughest Life Form

Earth’s Toughest Life Form

Here’s an article that opens the door on theories of what alien life may be. This is from the i paper: Scientists have investigated what will kill the world’s most indestructible species and concluded that almost nothing can – except the death of the sun. The tardigrade, also known as a water bear, space bear … Continue reading

Nemo’s Dad was… his Mum

Nemo’s Dad was… his Mum

This is a fascinating piece from the i: Male clownfish – the orange fish … seen in the film Finding Nemo – chnge their sex if their female mate dies, according to new research. A paper presented at the University of Exeter shows that the fish become female in order to better protect their territory. … Continue reading

Cancer Overtakes Marriage in UK

Here’s some scary statistics from yesterday’s i paper: Developing cancer is now more common than getting married or having a first baby… Analysis by Macmillan Cancer Support shows there were 361,216 cancers diagnosed in 2014 in the UK compared with 289,841 marriages. Getting cancer is also as common as graduating from university, and more common … Continue reading

Opera for Babies

Opera for Babies

This is one of the most bonkers but adorable ideas I’ve heard, but the interview with producer Phelim McDermott with Stuart Maconi on 6 music actually makes a lot of sense, especially within the realm of the Manchester International Festival which ended Sunday. McDermot was initially sceptical, fearing the babies would either be bored or … Continue reading

The Mediterranean Diet

The Mediterranean Diet

This is an article from Saturday’s i paper by Paul Gallagher which goes beyond the usual hype of diets. I had heard of Dr Malhotra’s work, and he provides a rare insight into the problems of modern healthcare. Dr Aseem Malotra is still on a mission. Almost 2 decades into a medical career that has … Continue reading

The Heroism of A Stranger

The Heroism of A Stranger

In the park adjoining the Museum of Childhood is a drinking fountain with an unusual and tragic history. Most marble fountains were erected by local worthies to provide refreshment for visitors, a few are memorials, but I doubt if any has such sadness associated with it. Water is essential to life. It is central to … Continue reading

Fish Tank

Fish Tank

This is the third Andrea Arnold directed film I’ve watched, so I think that’s the whole of her output, and this is another intriguing story of a young woman at odds with the world. Mia lives on a council estate in Essex. Her single mum has a boyfriend, an early appearance of Michael Fassbender. The … Continue reading

Counting Islands

Counting Islands

Here’s an oddity from a few days ago in the i paper: Indonesia is to begin the mammoth task of counting all of its islands with the aim of protecting its territory and natural resources. The government has never had a definite number of islands that make up the vast archipelago, with estimates reaching up … Continue reading

Writing and the Brain

Writing and the Brain

Here’s an article from Thursday’s i paper by Tom Bawden Learning to read profoundly transforms the brain, according to research which sheds new light on disorders such as dyslexia. It is because reading is such a new ability in human evolutionary history that our genes do not provide for a “reading area” i out brains. … Continue reading