Filed under biological research

Nourishment for our Brains

Nourishment for our Brains

This is from the i paper, an obituary for Marian Diamond Neuroscientist 11/11/1926 – 25/7/2017. Her work has huge implications for how our society is changing: Marian Diamond, a neuroscientist who studied Albert Einstein’s brain and was the first to show that the brain’s anatomy can change with experience, has died aged 90. … Her … Continue reading

Earth’s Toughest Life Form

Earth’s Toughest Life Form

Here’s an article that opens the door on theories of what alien life may be. This is from the i paper: Scientists have investigated what will kill the world’s most indestructible species and concluded that almost nothing can – except the death of the sun. The tardigrade, also known as a water bear, space bear … Continue reading

Nemo’s Dad was… his Mum

Nemo’s Dad was… his Mum

This is a fascinating piece from the i: Male clownfish – the orange fish … seen in the film Finding Nemo – chnge their sex if their female mate dies, according to new research. A paper presented at the University of Exeter shows that the fish become female in order to better protect their territory. … Continue reading

The Mediterranean Diet

The Mediterranean Diet

This is an article from Saturday’s i paper by Paul Gallagher which goes beyond the usual hype of diets. I had heard of Dr Malhotra’s work, and he provides a rare insight into the problems of modern healthcare. Dr Aseem Malotra is still on a mission. Almost 2 decades into a medical career that has … Continue reading

Iron Lung for Polio Victims

Iron Lung for Polio Victims

I am just old enough to remember the horrors of polio. A friend of mine had an older brother who was one of the last to be affected by it – he walked with a stick and his leg was in a brace so he was an object of pity for most of us. When … Continue reading

Killer Whales Kill Rare Whales

Killer Whales Kill Rare Whales

This is from the i paper, showing Orcas deserve their reputation as killers and the threats to endangered species are not entirely from humans: For the first time, killer whales have been spotted killing and eating a rare species of whale. A team of researchers led by Rebecca Wellard, of Curtin University, has been joining … Continue reading

Nobody is Safe Without NHS

Nobody is Safe Without NHS

Our much loved free healthcare is under threat but if it fails it won’t be just the poor who suffer. NHS provides mass immunisation so diseases that killed people on the past have been wiped out. Smallpox is an obvious example that killed vast numbers, rich and poor. Without jabs it could rdgutm with a … Continue reading

Smallpox in Hampshire 1774

Smallpox is a disease which caused lots of fatalities but inoculation against was discovered in the 18th century, so fear of it has long since faded. This is from the Hampshire Chronicle of March 1774: We hear that the small-pox is broke out at Bishops Waltham, a dread of which distemper has induced many of … Continue reading

Misunderstood Sloths and Slothery

Misunderstood Sloths and Slothery

My favourite animal has long been the 2 toed sloth, with a top speed when chased by a predator of 0.5mph. You don’t get more laid back than that, but if they are so inefficient, how have they managed to survive? This article from the i a few weeks back, by Becky Cliffe provides some … Continue reading

Albatrosses Running in Circles

Albatrosses Running in Circles

Since albatrosses are in the same family as seagulls who stamp on the ground to imitate rain, which draws their favourite food, worms, to the surface, this article fits with their family behaviour. This is by Tom Bawden in the i paper: Albatrosses secure much of their food using an extraordinary technique which involves furiously … Continue reading