Filed under Bible

The Cost of Accuracy

We all make mistakes, especially when typing at high speed, but this article in yesterday’s i makes me feel a bit better about the errors I’ve overlooked: “Companies House in London has been ordered to pay £8.8m o the owners of a family business in Cardiff forced into administratin after a typo made by the … Continue reading

On High Art

In David Byrne’s book How Music Works, he spends a lot of time complaining about how much money is poured into what is perceived as high art, whilst neglecting so many other art forms. He questions the very notion of high art, but that’s maybe because he doesn’t know the history of it. He cites … Continue reading

The Garden Museum

The Garden Museum

This is one of the lesser known attractions of London, in the former parish church of St Mary’s, Lambeth, facing the Thames and next to the Archbishop of Canterbury’s Palace. It has a wonderful garden, the former graveyard, maintained by volunteers.  It is free to enter, but there is a charge for special exhibitions. They … Continue reading

Invisible Women

A while ago I did a piece on the Pendle Witch Trials, in which modern research suggests they were covering up for Catholic priests. This is a piece from the book gunpowder plots by Antonia Fraser which shines some light on this: “the Catholic recusant population – the word comes from refusal, the refusal of … Continue reading

Sun Sets on Samaritans

The language of the Bible is integral to the English language, as when St Augustine brought Christianity to these islands, he was told to graft it onto pagan roots, and for centuries the only source of education and literature was the church. One of the most enduring stories from the Bible is that of the … Continue reading

From Mimicry to Drama

From Mimicry to Drama

More cribbings from my tome on St Bartholomew’s Fair: “The  first power of the mind revealed in every child is that of mimicry. The majority of me  go to the grave mimics; in religion, manners, language they have learnt their parts, and acquitted themselves in them more or less respectably. Nearly all child’s play is … Continue reading

Beliefs and Mirrors

Beliefs and Mirrors

I’m currently trawling though a book on literature and the English Civil War, and found a real gem by Benjamin Laney (1591-1675) who was vice chancellor of Cambridge University for a while, then went into exile with King Charles II and returned to be Bishop of Peterborough, Lincoln and Ely. I can’t find enough on … Continue reading

Bede Gets Venerable

Bede Gets Venerable

The Venerable Bede (673/4–735) was the first historian to write in English, which makes him a very important author. He wrote on many subjects; being a priest, it was of course mostly about religious matters, but also on English Grammar and vocabulary. The most original of Bede’s contributions to writing was his  kind of martyrology. … Continue reading