Names in the Landscape

There were a lot of casualties when English fields were enclosed: locals lost homes and much of their income. The old names, full of history and imagery were often lost tool. Here are some, from the book by Paul Jennings, ‘The Living Village’:

From Crayke, Yorkshire:

Fanny Field

Ninepenny Piece

Crabmills

Archers Close

Flagon Flats

Broad Dyke

Ruddings

Wind Cover

Crook Shaws

Fair Points

Wildermires

Jinhodgson

Nutbins

Willoughby, Lincs

Burial Ground

Rushes

Tavern Field

The Bogs

Magpie

Top Hat

Stripe

Axletree

From Smarden, Kent:

Shatter Oak

Good Water

Tainted

cCrumpled Horns

Gallows

Beggar’s Bridge

Rope

North America

Little Wild Carrots

Crooked Tom

Oyster Shell

Long John

Hawke’s Eyes

Oven

Germany

Snug Horn

Snail Thorne

Fight Field

The last commemorates a prize fight which took place there in 1859 between champion Tom Sayers and Bill Benjamin. A thousand spectators came from London by train to where the new Dover Railway ended at the time.

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