Posted in November 2014

Galileo Singing

Galileo did not have clocks accurate enough for his experiments so to measure acceleration he built a ramp with a groove down which he rolled a brass ball as he sang. On each beat of the song he marked the slope with a wire, so the ball clicked as it passed. The distance between the … Continue reading

The Voice of Youth

Here’s some graffiti from the heart sf student land in Cardiff Wonderful to see how outraged they are about the world they will soon inherit. “David Cameron is not the best!!! Nick Clegg is average. Wonder what they have to say about the labour leader? Ed Milliband wears suits perhaps?

Silent Partners

This is an exhibition now at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, which is subtitled ‘Artist & Mannequin from Function to Fetish’. That last seems to be what makes most people go a bit funny about the show, but it is really fascinating. We are used to seeing the human form in various forms of art, but … Continue reading

Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge

This wonderful museum was founded by Harold Ede, former curator of London’s Tate Gallery in the 1920s and 30s. He befriended many young artists at the time, including Ben and Winifred Nicholsobn, Henry Moore etc, and through them he began collecting works by their contemporaries such as Henri Gaudier-Brzseska, Joan Miro and others. Ede married … Continue reading

Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge

This wonderful museum was founded by Harold Ede, former curator of London’s Tate Gallery in the 1920s and 30s. He befriended many young artists at the time, including Ben and Winifred Nicholsobn, Henry Moore etc, and through them he began collecting works by their contemporaries such as Henri Gaudier-Brzseska, Joan Miro and others. Ede married … Continue reading

Not Such Dumb Birds

In Honor Ridout’s ‘Cambridge and Stourbridge Fair’, she describes a number of the entertainments, from human freaks to exotic animals, plays and musicians. But, “A different sort of catastrophe befell an exhibitor of animals when his ostrich died. The loss of so distinctive an exhibit must have been a blow… However, the death provided an … Continue reading

Fish and Fairs

The supply and control of the quality of food seems to have taken up most of the authorities time until modern age. Weights and measures were scrupulously checked, and if food or drink was unfit for consumption it was generally destroyed, sometimes burnt, in public, and the vendor fined or put into the pillory for … Continue reading

Dangerous Show

For much of human history, wherever people gathered, there was always a chance of something dangerous happening, but this seems to have been particularly common for shows, as many people often crowded into a small space, often lit by open flames. One of Cambridgeshire’s greatest tragedies happened at a puppet show. This is from Honor … Continue reading

High Church in a Low Town

High Church in a Low Town

Cambridge is in the east of England, so close to the heartland of the Roundheads in the Civil War, so should be all low church, ie simple decoration, and practice. So it is a surprise to find such an ornate High church in St Clements. It smells gorgeous, and has lots of paintings of the … Continue reading

Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

This is one of the strangest buildings – classical and white outside, dimly lit opulence inside. A wonderful collection of art from ancient to the latest.A lovely place. a rather bad pic of my favourite sculptor’s work, E.H. Bailey