A Strolling Woman Thief

This is from the Newcastle Chronicle, august 1766. I thought children were taken to the fields during harvest, but maybe it was a long walk for them. Hard to imagine this woman could not be found: On Wednesday afternoon, whilst Mr Francis Holmer, farmer, at the Nag’s Head, near Plausworth, in the road from Durham … Continue reading

Law Abiding in Yorkshire, 1766

This is from the Newcastle Chronicle of July 1766. It is noteworthy as soon after this, the south and west of England erupted in food riots. This region remained calm as they ate mostly potatoes instead of suffering speculation in wheat which caused bread to skyrocket in price. York, July 22 Last Friday the assizes … Continue reading

A New Word for an Old Problem

I tried to do some printing the other day, but my printer flashed up Error Code B200 and told me to contact my supplier. Too lazy to hunt out my sales documents, I instead googled the term. It seems Error Code B200 means a lot of things. It can be that the ink has run … Continue reading

Ensuring Fresh Meat at Markets

The guild of butchers was one of the most important, and its members among the most respected, due to their importance in ensuring safe food but also they had to heft large animal carcasses, so they were also big strong men, not the sort you would want to mess with. But it seems the lack … Continue reading

The Glorious Twelfth: What the BASC Aren’t Telling Us

Originally posted on A.C. Stark:
The Glorious Twelfth has passed. Which means that for the next 25 weeks droves of white, upper-class, tweed-adorned cronies, sharing in their conceited politico-moral sensibilities, will make to the Scottish Highlands, the Peaks, Norfolk and North Yorkshire (and anywhere else that’ll entertain them) to take part in a legalised blood frenzy. It’s not…

Battle of Fairs

There were many problems caused by the urbanisation of Britain; houses had to be build fast, and were often overcrowded and substandard. Before railways allowed mass movement of food, fairs and markets were crucial in ensuring food supplies, especially to the ‘great wen’ of London. Markets and fairs were conducted by licence, often of long … Continue reading

What’s medieval about the Medieval Quarter?

What’s medieval about the Medieval Quarter?

Originally posted on gtimperleyblog:
Finding the medieval in Manchester Better known as the Cottonopolis of the Industrial Revolution, ‘medieval’ isn’t a term frequently associated with the city of Manchester. Today’s Manchester Evening News article about the City Council’s plans for the revitalisation of ‘the Medieval Quarter’ poses the questions: since when was it the Medieval Quarter, and…

In a child’s mind

Originally posted on MusiCB3 Blog:
Thanks from schoolchildren to David and Gill Munrow after an early music workshop. The BBC over the last few years has tried to get children to become more involved in classical music. November 2014 saw the introduction of Ten Pieces, an initiative aimed initially at children of primary school age. There was a…

Market Fraudsters

Sale of goods in open markets was seen as a means of ensuring fair trading – the goods were in clear sight, they could be investigated, but there were many scams to cheat this system. I have read of butter being sold that had a core of lard with only a surface of butter around … Continue reading

Protecting Poor From Fraud

Eighteenth century England was riven with class differences, and the only people with a good education were those with wealth and with this came responsibility for protecting those less fortunate. Preventing the poor from being conned was not purely altruistic; if a person lost all their money to a con artist, they risked losing their … Continue reading